AS Daily News Roundup: Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Table of Contents
Education
ProJo: Teachers to stay on the job
ProJo: Students: Test-score requirement unfair
Health and Wellness
ProJo News Digest: State may revoke license for Warwick nursing home
PBN: Conference: Job growth to come in health care
Politics and Government
ProJo: Ex-staffers say Doyle tapped Institute funds
ProJo: Flanders hears residents’ wrath
ProJo: Charter revision panel to hold first hearing
ProJo: Manager’s budget plan meets resistance
ProJo: Sentencing bill has House hearing
ProJo: Senate approves ban on tanning by minors
Opinion
ProJo: ‘I’m Sorry’ laws are a boon for insurers


Education

ProJo: Teachers to stay on the job (A1)
By John Hill
WOONSOCKET — Teachers would probably keep working even if the school district misses its April 5 payroll, their union president said Tuesday.

ProJo: Students: Test-score requirement unfair (A2)
By Jennifer D. Jordan
PROVIDENCE –– High school students fighting an impending requirement that they and their classmates get a minimum score on statewide standardized tests to graduate will take their case to the State House Wednesday.The House Committee on Health, Education and Welfare will discuss House Bill 7413 shortly after 4:30 p.m. in Room 135.

Health and Wellness

ProJo News Digest: State may revoke license for Warwick nursing home (A10)
By Richard C. Dujardin
The Department of Health on Tuesday announced plans to begin revoking the nursing facility license for the Pawtuxet Village Care and Rehabilitation Center in Warwick, citing what it says are “years of non-compliance” with federal and state standards, including widespread neglect, a decline in resident adult daily living skills, and medication errors.

PBN: Conference: Job growth to come in health care 
By Michael Souza

SMITHFIELD – Health care is the largest and fastest-growing employment sector in the country, and Rhode Island is expecting that it will reap the job gains that are sure to come as the industry continues to evolve. That was the message delivered by participants in Bryant University’s third annual Rhode Island Economic Conference.

http://pbn.com/Job-growth-in-the-health-care-sector,66061?category_id=31&sub_type=stories,packages

Politics and Government

ProJo: Ex-staffers say Doyle tapped Institute funds (A1)
By Mike Stanton
Two former employees of the Institute for International Sport say that founder Daniel E. Doyle Jr. used Institute funds to pay his daughter’s college tuition and other personal expenses, including credit-card bills and costs associated with a for-profit summer sports camp Doyle runs near his home in Connecticut.

ProJo: Flanders hears residents’ wrath (A2)
By Jennifer D. Jordan
CENTRAL FALLS –– Anger over the role of receiver Robert G. Flanders Jr. in this bankrupt city spilled out during a meeting with the School Board of Trustees Tuesday, marring the evening’s cooperative atmosphere and exposing tensions as the city ventures into uncharted territory.

ProJo: Charter revision panel to hold first hearing (A3)
By Alisha A. Pina
PROVIDENCE — The Charter Review Commission will hold its first public hearing Wednesday to hear what residents would like changed in the way Providence is governed.

ProJo: Manager’s budget plan meets resistance (A4)
By Andy Smith
NORTH KINGSTOWN — Members of the Town Council said Tuesday that they will probably cut the town manager’s proposed budget, which calls for a 3.5-percent increase in the town’s tax levy.

ProJo: Sentencing bill has House hearing (A9)
By Katie Mulvaney
PROVIDENCE — As Richard Reyes serves prison time for fatally shooting his wife three years ago, a bill that grew from his criminal case is working its way through the General Assembly.

ProJo: Senate approves ban on tanning by minors (A9)
By Randal Edgar
PROVIDENCE — The Senate voted 26 to 8 Tuesday to pass a bill that would ban minors from using tanning salons unless they have approval from a doctor.

Opinion

ProJo: ‘I’m Sorry’ laws are a boon for insurers (B6)
By Gabriel H. Teninbaum
The Rhode Island General Assembly is considering an “I’m Sorry” law for medical-malpractice cases. The bill, 2012-H-7290, would let a doctor or hospital apologize to a patient after an act of malpractice, and then would prevent a jury from learning about the apology if the patient asked for compensation at a trial.
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